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Hunter S. Thompson lives

Just when I had despaired that all muscular election commentary had gone to Hunter Thompson's grave, I discovered Matt Taibbi. Where have I been? (Oh, yeah, buried in administrative ca-ca for five years.) His "Mad Dog Palin" is a series of socio-political observations delivered with raw, jaw-dropping, nail-gun accuracy. Fragile-ego reds are advised to skip this as it will make them cry like baby girls. Everybody else, drop everything and read it now.

11 comments:

  1. Brilliant writing. He makes me want to toss my computer over my deck. Thanks for sharing. xod

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  2. What's so refreshing about another far-left liberal view. It seems dime-a-dozen to me.

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  3. I imagine they all sound the same to you, John, because you don't bother to actually read them. Yawn. I was speaking more to the actual writing -- you know, the sentences? -- than the message. He's had a few choice things to say about Obama, too, so try not to get a wedgie about it.

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  4. That "Mad Dog Palin" piece truly reveals a profound writer. I would love to see other stuff from him now. Ironically, to my way of thinking, he hurls enough bile in the Palin response to be just like her in some regard, but perhaps he knows this and will just enjoy a lot of self-loathing because of it. His use of popular culture references is supreme, and I love the specific tv-ready visual images he creates coupled with political and sociological abstractions. A stronger piece would've toned down the author's incendiary anger and still said the same thing perhaps, but we all do get emotional about this time in a close election. The guy is genius even with his Walt Whitman-esque subtext of "Very well, I contradict myself." How ever did you stumble upon him? If you meet him, I hope you sleep with him. I would.

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  5. I will write to you using my full name. I think the piece was terrific and I am going to keep reading him. Thanks for the link. Hope you are doing well.

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  6. Yes, the courage of "Anonymous" is breathtaking, isn't it? I found the piece quite sobering and, sure, impassioned. But then, comparing one's self to a pit bull doesn't strike me as very measured or mild-mannered--or an invitation for such. I didn't agree with all of Taibbi's conclusions, but that's what's great about the United States, isn't it? That we don't have to march in lockstep? Oh, wait. That's the old U.S., as in old Europe, I suppose. What I find most bizarre, though, is the reference to sleeping with Taibbi. This is relevant . . . how?

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  7. Kelly...

    I have to agree with you about the writing. It's delicious. No wedgies here!

    Thanks for turning us on to a great thinker.

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  8. I have a fragile ego.

    It's sort of a creative article. It also seems like low-hanging fruit, though. I've been reading stuff like this for the past eight years and it doesn't seem to get anywhere. It reminds me of the SF columnist Mark Morford. Seems like it would be more fun to skewer all sides. I wonder what his take would be on this creep-fest?

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  9. Kelly, thanks for sharing a writer whose work I've been able to share with many people. Joanne Lobeski Snyder

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  10. Kelly,

    Followed a link from Doni's place and found your treasure trove of articles. Great stuff.
    And thanks for the tip on this Taibbi piece. He's one of my longtime favorites; a bit more subdued ego than Thompson but plenty of bite.

    You may find his exposé of the fundamentalist community as fascinating and troubling as I did:

    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/20278737/jesus_made_me_puke/print

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  11. Here's the complete URL for Taibbi's "Jesus Made Me Puke" in Rolling Stone:

    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/20278737/jesus_made_me_puke/print

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